Filtered by tag: Communication Remove Filter

Be Present and Focus Before You Speak

Written by Joe Curcillo

When you are preparing to speak to an audience of one, or one thousand, you will stand alone. You will not be squaring off against a visible adversary. Instead, the adversary that we face lives within us and within our audience: doubt. That hesitation that exists when we are asked for the very first time to accept the unknown is the enemy, and the enemy must be vanquished. Conquering doubt is the key to success, and we conquer it through education and preparation.

In late 2017, I watched a newbie lawyer argue a case before a judge. He had mastered his research; he knew his stuff. Unfortunately, the fear and confusion in his eyes as the judge began to question him was reminiscent of a small rabbit in the talons of an eagle.

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The Language of Neurodiversity

Neurodiversity Terms and Definitions in the Age of Inclusivity
Written by Susan Fitzell

In my work to help businesses and educational organizations develop and implement strategies that optimize learning and productivity in a neurodiverse world, I have come to realize that there is quite a bit of confusion out there about the simple terminology and vocabulary we use to discuss neurodiversity and the neurodivergent community.

An AHA Moment in a Podcast

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TO INFLUENCE OTHERS, KNOW YOURSELF

Written by Joe Curcillo

You might think, “I don’t care what people think about me.” Actually, you do. And you should. Not to seek their approval, that’s a waste of time. You don’t need others to like you to influence them, but you do need to know what they think of you, so you can deal with it.

If are going to influence people and lead them, how they see you has a major effect on how they respond to you. You may be very focused and driven to accomplish your goals, but if the people you need on your side see your drive and focus as coming from a malignant self-interest, they may interpret your desires as a threat to their well-being and work against you. If they see you as aloof or clueless, they may interpret that as a lack of direction and use it to manipulate you or just leave and find a different opportunity. In either case, people will be reluctant to follow your lead. 

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